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August 24, 2005

Comments

hummbumm

Sex sells, and we all know that american women are "sluts", one can only imagine in the military, with big guns... I think this program will be watched and talked about because it confirms stereotypes and is about sex, and guns, and iraq, and abu ghraib. It is genius, worthy of Fox!

Jeremy

Maybe the ran it because its true... and the stuff about Mosul is newsworthy

the aardvark

I dunno... it seems timed to an upcoming book release, rather than to inherent news value. Has there been any publicity for the book or for Williams here in the US?

The Lounsbury

Well, Arabiyah also runs cheap, whacko and oddly translated US lefty docos on how evil the US Gov is. I should imagine that they have a bit of wiggle room to play to the audiences.

SP

I'm pretty sure I first read about that book in the New York Times.

vasi

Just to be pedanctic, Al-Arabiya wasn't "banned" in Israel in the sense that watching it is illegal. Instead Israeli government officials are banned from appearing in interviews on the channel.

rhonda

Yes, it's a published book. Amazon has some reviews. Apparently, she was a sgt in an intelligence unit. She learned to speak Arabic and served as a translator. Most of the reviews don't describe it as a sexual tell-all kind of story.

Ritzy Mabrouk

She was on the air saying the things she said, that is certainly newsworthy. Or did you mean Al Arabeya shouldn't have aired it because in your opinion they should not run anti-american news stories?

aardvark

No, it's not a matter of "should" or "shouldn't" - it's surprising because al-Arabiya seems to be cultivating a pro-American reputation, which makes this an odd editorial decision.

Abu Sinan

It is an issue in the US military, not just the army. Divorce rates are higher than in the general community. Married, not married, it doesnt matter. Adultery is illegal in the US military, but it doesnt stop anyone. It just isnt the people in the military, it is their spouses when they are away. I grew up in an American military family and worked for the US DoD along side the US Air Force.

It was well known, when units get deployed, a good chunk of their wives would be out at the local clubs the next day. There is also a well known saying in the US military "What goes TDY stays TDY." Meaning when you are on temp duty, everything goes, nothing counts.

Josh

FYI, Williams is on today's "Fresh Air".

Stacey

The BBC had this coverage:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/4178144.stm

This piece, at least, doesn't make the book look unambiguously "anti-American."

Minh-Duc

I was in Iraq for 12 months last year. I must have been in a wrong place because I did not get any.

windinthewhistle

In some distant future, in what I hope will be a more honest age, I think social historians will be able to document just how widespread are sexual practices that seem to us now to be beyond the pale; how much infidelity, how much same-sex contact, how many menages a troi and other experimentation, and so on ... and that their frequency will not differ that much across places and cultures. My own prediction is that such histories will reveal a lot more of it going on than people expect, but that all the autre sex will be neither as frequent (on a per capita basis) or as mind-blowing as our imaginations would lead us to believe. And, that those historians will wonder, somewhat amusedly, what all the hoo-hah was about.

In the US military (where you get the result you might expect by putting a bunch of fit, active, self-confident young men and women together), such things are punishable under a number of articles of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (Article 125 is written in such a way that anything other than straight missionary-position sex can be considered 'sodomy'). Reality bites, though, and the application appears to be left up to local commanders. Some take a 'boys will be boys (and girls)' approach, others seek to bring the wrath of god down, and some deal with it more pragmatically on a case by case basis. So on the one hand you have Kayla Williams, on the other you have the married couple serving in the same unit who aren't allowed to be alone in the same tent together, and somewhere in the middle you have the hapless Minh-Duc ...

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